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Author Archives: Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

Relief for Upper Respiratory Illnesses

Spring has sprung but that doesn’t mean we’re out of the woods just yet when it comes to cold and flu season. Upper respiratory illnesses (URI) are common in the early spring, just like the fall and winter seasons. The upper respiratory system includes the mouth, nose, sinuses, larynx, throat, and trachea. Unfortunately, many of the these URIs are viral and cannot be treated by antibiotics. These infections are not usually treated with antibiotics unless there is proof of a bacterial infection.

The common cold is a URI and a viral illness. Symptoms can include: a stuffy nose, muscle aches, sneezing, a sore throat, post-nasal drip, cough, and a mild fever (under 101.5). A cold can last anywhere from 3 to 14 days. If you’re illness is lasting at least 10 days with no improvement, you should schedule an appointment for an evaluation with the doctor.  Also, if you are experiencing a high fever, shortness of breath, wheezing, confusion, chest pain, teeth-chattering chills, or rib pain, you should make an appointment to see the doctor as soon as possible. At my office, our nursing staff can triage patients quickly with the above-mentioned issues. We can test for influenza (the flu) and low oxygen levels to check for more serious illnesses beyond a cold or allergy. We can also test for strep throat in our office quickly through a swab test.

Since viral infections cannot be treated with antibiotics, there are many remedies a person can do to lessen the symptoms and duration of his or her URI. Below, I’ve shared a few things that can be used when suffering from a URI.

  1. Vitamin C – When taken at a high dosage (1000mg 3 times a day), vitamin C has been known to shorten the duration of a cold.
  2. Zinc gluconate (Coldeez brand) – Take 5 to 6 lozenges per day every two hours. The high level of zinc gluconate (13.3 mg) improves symptoms and shortens duration of illness.
  3. Antihistamines (Zyrtec, Claritin, Alavert, Loratidine, Tavist,) can help with coughs and drying secretions.
  4. Vicks menthol rub can help breathing and provide relieve at night when applied to the chest, throat, and upper lip.
  5. Nasal saline can help flush out nostrils.
  6. Ibuprofen and other anti-inflammation medication can reduce a fever, headaches, and muscle aches. If you are on blood thinners or anti-platelet therapy, use acetaminophen instead of Iburprofen or asprin. If you are allergic to NSAIDS, avoid Ibuprofen, Aleve, or aspirin.

Below,  I’ve shared are a few links to medicinal products I offer and approve  on my website to help ease URI symptoms.

Sinus Relief Products

 

Cold and Cough Products

 

Pain Relievers

 

Allergy Medication

If you’re experience a long-lasting cold, flu-like or strep throat symptoms, give me, Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipids & Wellness of Fort Myers, and my team a call today at 239-362-3005, ext. 200 or click here to contact us to schedule an appointment today.

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March 27, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

The 101 on Sodium (Dietary Salt)

Dietary salt, or sodium, isn’t bad for most persons. Sodium is an essential part of a person’s diet.  It helps the body perform many different functions.

Moderation is the key when considering the amount a person should consume. Believe it or not, too little sodium in a person’s diet can also have negative effects on the body.

In the body, dietary salt helps maintain the electrical charge in cells, and distributes fluids in the body. The nervous system requires sodium to function. Dietary salt also helps promote proper muscle function and movement.  In the intestines, sodium helps the body absorb chloride, amino acids, glucose and water. On average a person only needs to replace about 2,000 milligrams of sodium each day.

The American Heart Association reports the average American takes in around 3,436 milligrams per day. This means on average Americans are eating more sodium than they need to.

Too Much Sodium – can be a serious problem for persons with certain diseases such as heart failure. It can also fight effective blood pressure control.

When you consume too much sodium, the follow things occur:

  • Increase of fluid in blood vessels, which raises blood pressure.
  • Brain tells you that your thirsty because of the increased salt in the body.
  • Kidneys try to rid the body of excess salt through urine.
  • Elevated blood pressure from too much salt can lead to an enlarged heart.
  • Extra pressure on the heart because of the presence of excess water in the blood.
  • Water retention and bloating.

Too Little Sodium

When you consume too little sodium, the follow things occur:

  • Nausea, vomiting, upset stomach.
  • Headache.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Disorientation, seizures, brain damage.
  • Loss of proper muscle control.
  • Cerebral edema (brain swelling).

If you’re unsure of your current salt intake, you can start to track your daily sodium intake by following serving information on food labels which also list the amount of sodium per serving.

If you’re experiencing any symptoms noted above, you may wish to consult a doctor to determine what the cause could be. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid, & Wellness in Fort Myers can give you a dietary assessment and determine what amount of dietary salt you should be ingesting. To book an appointment with Dr. Kordonowy, click here or call 239-362-3006, ext. 200.

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March 21, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

What A Pain: Headache Types and Management for Them

Each year, around 45 million Americans complain about headaches.  It is one of the ailments people complain about the most. Approximately 8 million people per year make a trip to the doctor to seek diagnosis and management for headaches.  Making a correct diagnosis is the most efficient way to get control of this common problem. Causes include: tension headaches, migraines, cluster headaches, sinus headaches and neuralgia headaches. Headaches vary in severity and length.

Many people reach for over-the-counter pain killers to bring them relief. However, there are some other ways to potentially dull or eliminate the pounding in your head. Below, I will detail features of the various kinds of headaches.

  • A tension headache is the most common and appear due to stress or fatigue. If these become chronic or frequent, a person should see a doctor as there may be an underlying condition. Neck stretching, proper pillow and neck alignment including at work can really solve this problem.
  • A migraine can be debilitating; they are known as vascular headaches, because they come about from the changes in size of arteries that feed into the brain, which alter serotonin levels that lead to pain. Migraines are often precipitated by stress, allergies, bright light, loud sounds, changes in hormones, and diet/foods.
  • A cluster headache often comes without warning and reoccur in clusters where the pain comes and goes. They are even more painful than a migraine and they can last for weeks or months on and off. A cluster headache can last anywhere from 15 minutes to three hours, recur several times throughout the day. This headache type is considered of a vascular type like migraine.
  • A sinus headaches occur from swelling and congestion of the sinuses cause by allergic nasal congestion or infection in the sinus cavities which is known as sinusitis.
  • A stress headache is the result and response from the body after it experiences physical, emotional, and biochemical stresses. Tension headaches are often referred to as stress headaches.

Following is a list of non-medicine strategies for headache management.

  • Avoid over-sleeping or under-sleeping
  • Massage
  • Neck and shoulder stretching
  • Apply heat and cold to the temples and neck
  • Exercises like walking, biking, swimming, or yoga
  • Meditation and relaxation exercises like deep breathing and listening to music
  • Diet review- Avoid caffeine, alcohol, aspartame, tyramine (in nuts, cheeses, soy), phenylethylamine (in chocolate and cheeses, MSG, nitrites, and nitrates (flavoring), which can trigger headaches for some people
  • Physical therapy or occupational therapy including biofeedback and workplace evaluation (for tension/stress headaches)
  • Sublingual immunotherapy if the problem is allergic rhinitis

For typical/common temporary headaches, a person can try to take over-the-counter pain relievers, get lots of rest, eat properly, exercise, and stay hydrated. If you have debilitating headaches or frequently-occurring headaches, you should see a doctor to rule out any underlying conditions.  If you suffer from persistent, new or undiagnosed headaches and need help, schedule an appointment with Dr Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness in Fort Myers. Dr. Kordonowy can help determine the cause of your head pain and come up with a treatment plant to prevent or minimize future headaches. Click here or call 239-362-3005, ext. 200 to book an appointment.

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March 16, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.