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Author Archives: Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

How to Manage Adult Acne

Acne isn’t just a teenager’s problem. In fact, acne is the most common skin condition in the United States. If you have acne and are an adult, you are not alone! Around 50 million Americans deal with acne every year.  Fifty percent of adult women and 25 percent of adult men suffer from acne. Sadly, acne cannot be cured, but it can be effectively treated. In the United States, $3 billion is spent annually in the United States on acne treatments. There is no one treatment for this condition. With different genetics, skin types, hormones, and environments, it’s easy to understand why people respond differently to treatment strategies.

Even though an adult is far past puberty, there are several factors that can lead to people developing acne, including: overactive oil glans, genetics, hormones, menstruation, stress, depression, medications, and foods with a high glycemic index (white bread, sweets, white rice).  Each person has the bacterium Propionibacterium on their skin.  When this bacterium gets into the pores, it can cause a person’s skin to breakout. Killing this bacterium doesn’t always work to clear up everyone’s faces. It’s not necessarily the bacteria that is causing a person’s skin to develop acne per se, it’s how his or her skin reacts to that bacteria.

Acne, which is a chronic inflammatory skin condition, can appear in many forms, including blackheads, whiteheads, cysts, and nodules; it can be found on the face, back, shoulders, chest, arms, buttocks, and neck.  Acne is unsightly and can be quite embarrassing by many who have it.

What is the best way to treat your acne? Well, this may take some trial and error, but it’s also best for you to discuss this topic with your primary care doctor or a dermatologist. He or she can exam your skin and listen to your symptoms to determine the best treatment plan.

  • Washing acne-prone areas of skin daily, especially after exercising or sweating, can help reduce your breakouts. Scrub gently.
  • Purchase oil-free cosmetics and lotions.
  • Don’t pick at acne or pop pimples, because it could lead to scarring.

For mild acne, topical creams (benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, and salicylic acid) will work. For more severe cases, a person most likely will take an oral antibiotic (tetracycline, doxycycline, trimethoprim/sulfa). If you are taking a medication or acne product prescribed by your doctor, wait about 4 to 8 weeks to see full results.

The anti-inflammatory isotretinoin has been known to work wonderfully on people with severe acne, but there are claims it can lead to depression and suicidal thoughts, as well as irritable bowel disease. Although, the relation has not been scientifically proven, not all doctors will prescribe this medication for those reasons. Chemical peels, dermabrasion and laser resurfacing help with acne scaring, but you should talk to your doctor about acne scar treatment.

Eating greasy pizza won’t give you acne, and tanning beds won’t clear it up for you. Unfortunately, acne is a part of life, and around 95 percent of Americans experience it at some in their lives. If you’re currently suffering from acne or scars, it’s best to talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan.

Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness of Fort Myers can exam your skin and work with you to come up a plan to treat your acne.  To schedule an appointment with Dr. Kordonowy, call 239-362-3005, ext. 200 or click here. Dr. Kordonowy offers direct patient care membership and concierge services including the unique Inpatient Advocate Service™

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August 16, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

Vitamins & Supplements for Heart Health

A healthy diet could aide in saving your life. By eating balanced, nutritious meals, you are fueling the body with what it needs to keep your cholesterol and sugar levels in check, while fighting off harmful diseases. Instead of thinking about what to take out of your diet, focus your attention on what foods you should be adding in to your daily eating habits. Lean meats, fruits, vegetables, “good” fats, and whole grains are essential to your health, especially heart health.

However, no one has the perfect diet. Life gets in the way sometimes, and you could have a few days in the week in which you didn’t get in enough vitamins. Whether you were too busy or just not in the mood for a salad, your diet can sometimes fall short. That’s OK. If your consistently eating healthy over time, your body will reap the benefits. Since we cannot have the perfect diet, it can be good for you to supplement your diet with vitamins, but talk to your doctor about what you should or can take daily, especially if you think you may have a vitamin deficiency.

For this article, I wanted to share with you some vitamins and supplements that you can take to help with your cardiovascular health. Whether you currently have a heart condition or not, it’s always a good idea to try and keep your heart at its healthiest, since heart disease is the #1 killer in America. The following list are supplements and vitamins that can help keep heart conditions at bay, or keep your heart from further deterioration.

Magnesium – Magnesium helps sodium move throughout the cells in the body, supports relaxation and dilation of vascular arterial walls and stabilizes heart rhythm.

Omega-3 – Omega-3 helps the body balance cholesterol and triglycerides, which is great for people who are at risk for heart disease. Omega-3 is also known to lower blood pressure and slows down the buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) – Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant that fights off free radicals, and manages blood pressure and cholesterol. It also helps with keep the arteries healthy and muscle cells optimally utilizing energy.

L-carnitine – L-carnitine helps transport fat into the mitochondria to be used and burned as fuel by cells.

Arginine – Arginine is an amino acid that helps improve vascular function.

Phospholipids– are necessary to “prime” the HDL particle thus allowing it to sop up cholesterol.

If you’re looking for help with your diet or have concerns about your heart health, Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness of Fort Myers offers comprehensive dietary consults to his patients. Dr. Kordonowy also offers vitamins and supplements for you to purchase online here.   Dr. Kordonowy offers direct patient care membership and concierge services including the unique Inpatient Advocate Service™. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Kordonowy, call 239-362-3005, ext. 200 or click here.

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August 7, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

What to Do About Your Varicose Veins

More than 40 million Americans have and suffer from varicose veins.  Unfortunately, if varicose veins run in your family, you have a high chance of developing symptomatic venous disease yourself. Genetics plays a significant role in this problem. Around half of cases are attributed to hereditary. There are other factors that lead to their development, including: high height (a gravity thing) age (50 or older), prolonged sitting or standing, women going through menopause, pregnancy, women on birth control bills, and obesity.

What is a varicose vein? A varicose vein is a diseased vein that is enlarged or bulging, usually dark blue or purple in color. They are most often found in the legs, but can also appear in the ankles and feet.  Most often, varicosities develop due to a vein valve incompetence. Varicose veins represent venous disease which in an advance stage can promote a lot of symptoms and issues.

When a vein valve doesn’t close properly, blood leaks in the wrong direction from the thigh into the calf. Blood will begin to pool in the calves, ankles, and feet. This pooling of blood creates an intense pressure so the veins begin to stretch, bulge and enlarge- varicosities result. These bad veins can lead to more enlarged veins downstream from the initial incompetence.

Varicose veins can be a sign of circulatory problems and can potentially lead to blood clots, ulcers, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The veins are not only unsightly, but they are potentially dangerous to your health.

With varicose veins, people often experience pain in their legs, along with swelling, achiness, fatigue, restlessness, and a heavy or throbbing feeling in the legs.

To reduce symptoms or prevent the development of varicose veins in your body, here are some tips

  • Elevate legs when resting.
  • Exercise regularly to keep the blood flowing.
  • Wear compression stockings.
  • Wear low-heeled shoes or flats to keep the blood properly flowing.
  • Avoid standing or sitting for long periods of time. If you have a job that requires either, make sure to either rest or get up and move every so often.
  • Maintain a healthy diet so your weight is in a healthy range.

Although the above tips may help reduce pain and other symptoms, they cannot rid you of varicose veins. Often, patients undergo outpatient vein procedures to eliminate source veins, signs and symptoms. If you suffer from varicose veins or it runs in your family, contact Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness. Dr. Kordonowy can exam your legs or evaluate your symptoms and history to determine next steps. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Kordonowy, call 239-362-3005, ext. 200 or click here. Dr. Kordonowy is a concierge and direct primary care doctor in Fort Myers.

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July 31, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.