• ---Select Speciality---
  • ---Select Location---

Author Archives: Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

Common Nutritional Deficiencies

Even in Western countries where food is relatively plentiful, there are still millions of people who suffer from nutritional deficiencies.  Often, these deficiencies express themselves in minor ailments that many people ignore, because people assume that if they’re eating enough they’re also getting enough nutrients.  However, because of the nature of highly processed foods and other problems with manufactured food, many people are not getting the proper nutrients they need.  Here are a few of the most common nutritional deficiencies in the United States:

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is important for bone health, as it is involved in helping bones absorb calcium.  Vitamin D deficiencies are fairly widespread in the United States, and this can lead to a decrease in bone health, especially among the elderly.  Some foods like milk and bread have vitamin D added, but eggs and fish are also a great natural source.  The easiest way to get vitamin D is to spend a little bit of time in the sun every day, as the body naturally produces vitamin D when exposed to sunlight.

Calcium

Calcium is also important for bone health, and as mentioned above works with Vitamin D to replenish the bones.  Calcium helps people recover from activity and exercise, especially endurance and high-intensity exercise.  Calcium is most commonly found in dairy products, but other healthy sources include almonds and salmon.  Be sure to increase your vitamin D to help your body absorb calcium.

Potassium

Potassium helps with muscle functioning, including the heart, and with healthy nerve tissue.  Sometimes healthy levels of potassium can help lower blood pressure.  Fluid loss through excessive sweating, or from vomiting or diarrhea can flush potassium out of the body, causing a deficiency.  Bananas are the most well-known source of potassium, but many other foods are also a good source, including mushrooms, potatoes, and leafy, green vegetables.

 

Iron

Iron is important for healthy red blood cells and the immune system, as well as the general growth and functioning of our bodies.  People with iron deficiencies may feel fatigued or be more susceptible to illness.  Iron can be gained from many meats, with organ meats being the richest source.  Oysters, clams, chicken, turkey, and red meat are great sources of iron. Iron deficiency is most common among women, but anyone with poor eating habits can also be at risk.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 helps the body produce energy by assisting in enzymatic reactions.  In addition, B12 helps make neurotransmitters in the brain as well as in the production of DNA.  The source of vitamin B12 is primarily from animals, through meats like chicken and fish, as well as animal products like milk and yogurt.  The increase in recent years of the Vegan lifestyle has increased the incidence of Vitamin B12 deficiency, but even Vegans have options of B12-fortified foods.  Most healthy adults can usually get enough B12 through diet alone.

Nutritional deficiencies aren’t immediately life-threatening, but over time the negative effects can build up and adversely affect your health.  Even a general feeling of weariness and lack of motivation might be a sign of some deficiency.  Be sure to critically examine your diet to see what you might be missing out on, and definitely consult a doctor for advice in getting the nutrients your body needs.  Contact Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipids, and Wellness in Fort Myers for a nutritional consultation.  A certified dietician is available at the office.  Call him today at 239-362-3005, ext. 200 or click here. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness is a concierge, patient membership physician in Fort Myers, and provides direct primary care services.

The post Common Nutritional Deficiencies appeared first on .

December 18, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

The Importance of Iron

Popeye knew what he was doing by eating his spinach. He turned to spinach to get stronger, which is true – spinach can help a person feel/be stronger. How? Spinach is loaded with iron, which not only helps a person’s strength, but also can give a person energy, strengthen bones, improve brain and cardiovascular function, and keep the digestive tract healthy. Sadly, low iron is the number one nutritional deficiency in America.

 

If you’ve ever felt extra exhausted or weak, there’s a good chance you may be lacking this mineral, especially if you’re a woman. Around 10 percent of women in America are deficient in iron, according to the CDC.

 

Iron is an essential mineral that is extremely important for the body to have a proper amount. This mineral helps transport oxygen throughout the body. Iron is an important component of hemoglobin, which is the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. In fact, hemoglobin represents, around two-thirds of the body’s iron. If your body is lacking iron, the body cannot make enough heathy oxygen-carrying red blood cells, and you most likely will develop anemia.

 

When the body lacks oxygen, you feel fatigued and exhausted; your body will have a tougher time fighting off infections or even thinking or making decisions properly.

 

How do you know if you have a deficiency? Often, people don’t even realize they have anemia unless they are beyond fatigued, pale, or have a hard time exercising. Symptoms of low iron include:

 

  • Shortness of breath
  • Increased heart beat
  • Sores at corner of the mouth
  • Cold hands and feet
  • A sore tongue
  • Brittle nails
  • Hair loss
  • Difficulty swallowing

 

A doctor can detect an iron deficiency through a blood test. If you are pregnant, have ulcerative colitis, celiac disease or Chron’s, you should get your blood tested regularly.

 

The amount you need depends on age, gender, and health. Your doctor will help determine how much you need. Your doctor will suggest an iron-rich diet if your iron is low. Iron-rich foods include: red meat, spinach, beans, dried fruit, and fortified cereals. However, your diet may not be enough for your deficiency, and your doctor may recommend an iron supplement. Your doctor will start you on a low dose and gradually increase your dosage, so your chance of developing side effects (constipation, upset stomach, vomiting) is lessened. Adults shouldn’t take more than 45 mg of iron a day.

 

If you’ve been extra sluggish lately (even though you get enough sleep) and your mind seems foggy, you may be low in iron. Your best bet is to get your blood levels checked by a doctor. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness of Fort Myers will examine you and order a blood test to determine if you have an iron deficiency or another issue. To book a consult, click here or call 239-362-3005, ext. 200. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness is a concierge, patient membership physician in Fort Myers, and provides direct primary care services.

 

The post The Importance of Iron appeared first on .

December 11, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

What to Do About Eczema

Have you noticed any red blotches on your skin? Maybe some blisters? Do they ooze or crust? Is your skin scaly? Do these skin conditions come and go? There’s a very good chance you could have eczema. Eczema isn’t just a child’s group of skin conditions, it can affect adults, as well.  In fact, 17 percent of the population suffers from eczema. With adult-onset eczema, sometimes the flare ups of the condition disappear as suddenly as they appeared; it can be unpredictable.

 

Eczema can be chronic for many people, but it can be controlled with the proper treatment. Skin conditions can be hard for medical professionals to diagnose and treat, because so many conditions can resemble other conditions. From bug bites and rashes to allergic reactions and diseases, doctors have a lot to sort through in figuring out what a person’s skin is reacting or responding to.  When it comes to eczema, there are a few signs and symptoms that make it obvious this is what the patient is suffering from:

 

  • Eczema always causes itchiness where its affecting the skin.
  • Rashes usually occur on face, arms, knees, hands or feet, but can affect other areas, as well.
  • The skin will appear dry, thickened, or scaly.
  • The skin can appear reddish and then turn brown on fair-skinned people.
  • On darker skin tones, eczema can change the pigmentation, so it appears lighter or darker.

 

It is still unknown what causes eczema, but it is thought to be linked to an overactive response of the immune system to some irritant. However, eczema is commonly found in families with histories of both allergies and/or asthma. You cannot spread eczema to another person.

 

Some reasons for flare ups include: touching rough textures, exposure to something hot or cold, exposure to certain soaps, cleaners, or detergents, exposure to animal dander, having a cold or upper respiratory infection, or stress.

 

There is no cure for eczema, but it can be managed. Doctors will prescribe creams (emollients) to deter itching and keep the skin moisturized. Cold compresses and antihistamines also can help reduce itching. Steroid creams, like hydrocortisone 1% (as well as prescription-level creams) can be helpful in reducing inflammation. In extreme cases, oral corticosteroids will be prescribed or antibiotics, if the areas have become infected.

 

During an exam, your doctor may order an allergy test to see if you have and possible allergies that are triggering the symptoms.

 

To try and avoid a future flare up, you should:

  • Keep your skin moisturized.
  • Reduce stress.
  • Avoid sudden changes in temperature.
  • Avoid sweating/overheating.
  • Avoid materials like wool that cause scratching.
  • Avoid harsh soaps/cleaners/detergents
  • Stay away from foods that you may be allergic or sensitive to.

 

If you have an unidentified skin condition or think you may have eczema, you’ll want to get it checked out right away. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness of Fort Myers will examine you and prescribe you with the proper treatment based on your symptoms. To book a consult, click here or call 239-362-3005, ext. 200. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness is a concierge, patient membership physician in Fort Myers, and provides direct primary care services.

 

The post What to Do About Eczema appeared first on .

December 4, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.