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Author Archives: Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

Things to Know About Adult-Onset Asthma

When someone thinks of asthma, often the image of a child wheezing and/or using an inhaler pops into mind. Asthma isn’t just a childhood disorder. In fact, some people develop asthma in their adult years despite never having asthma as a child. Adult-onset asthma can be more severe than childhood-onset asthma. For those who develop asthma as an adult, they often experience more attacks, persistent symptoms, and their lung function declines faster.

To sum up briefly, asthma is a disease in which a person’s airways become narrowed due to inflammation the result of which promotes various respiratory symptoms including: coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

How does a person develop adult-onset asthma? There are many factors that cause adult-onset asthma, but family genetics is not one of them. Below are a few reasons a person would develop this condition in their adult years:

  • Environment – If a person’s workplace contains or uses certain chemicals or allergens, this can trigger asthma symptoms.
  • Allergies – Around 30 percent of adult-onset asthma cases are caused by allergies.
  • Smoking – Smoking increases a person’s risk of asthma.
  • Respiratory infections – Infections may compromise airways or make them more sensitive, which can lead to chronic inflammation. Infections commonly cause acute asthmatic bronchitis which may be self-limited.

Women are more likely to have adult-onset asthma than men. People who are overweight also have a higher risk of developing the condition.

To diagnose this condition, a doctor will examine a patient, listen to all the symptoms, and perform lung function testing.  Functional testing will show how much and how fast the person can inhale and exhale. The doctor will try to determine what triggers the patient’s asthma. Then, he or she will prescribe inhaled or oral corticosteroids, depending on the severity of the condition. Often, daily medication is needed to keep the asthma under control. You can continue to visit the doctor for lung testing or check your lungs daily at home with a peak flow meter.

If you’ve been diagnosed with adult-onset asthma, try your best to avoid your triggers. Whether it’s smoking, dust, mold, pollen, cats, foods, workplace chemicals, find a way to either avoid, protect yourself, or limit your accessibility to these dangerous triggers.

Keep your eye on your asthma always, and get it regularly checked. Some research has shown 95 percent of people diagnosed with adult-onset still had it five years later, which means it doesn’t often go away.

If you think you may have asthma, get it checked out as soon as possible. Untreated asthma can lead to a permanent loss of lung function. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness of Fort Myers can exam and test your lungs to see if you have asthma or another condition. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Kordonowy, call 239-362-3005, ext. 200 or click here. Dr. Kordonowy offers direct patient care membership and concierge services including the unique Inpatient Advocate Service™

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September 20, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

AFib: Know the Facts About this Silent Killer

One day you’re feeling great. The next, suddenly, your heart feels like it skipped a beat. Or maybe, your heart feels like it’s banging around in the chest wall. Then, you start to feel light-headed, nauseous, and weak. What’s going on? Most likely, you’re experiencing atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation (AFib or AF) is a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, blood clots, heart failure, and other heat conditions. If you have AFib, you’re not alone; at least 2.7 million Americans live with this condition.

Why does AFib occur? AFib occurs when the two upper chambers of the heart are experiencing chaotic electrical signals, making them flutter or quiver. A person’s heart rate in AFib is around 100 to 175 beats a minute while a normal heart rate range is 60 to 100 bpm.

Following are possible causes of Afib:  acute infection especially viral, aging, structural changes to the heart including valvular conditions, coronary artery disease, overactive thyroid gland, lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, acute physical stress and pain (such as following surgery).

There are some people who experience AFib with no heart abnormalities; this type of AFib is called lone atrial fibrillation. The cause for this type of condition isn’t fully clear.

On its own, atrial fibrillation can increase the risk of a stroke, and it is a leading risk factor for stroke. It accounts for 15 percent of all strokes and 30 percent of strokes for people 80 years old and older.  It is most common with people older than 60. If AFib is left untreated, a person has a two to five percent chance of having a stroke that year, and their chances of developing any other heart-related issues can double.

How can AFib cause a stroke? The irregular heartbeats cause blood to pool in a specific susceptible area of the heart called the left atrial appendage. The stagnant, pooling blood can form a clot which can “break off and migrate to other parts of the body.  If clots travel to the brain, a person may experience a stroke. Sometimes, AFib occurs without physical symptoms, so some people don’t even realize they are living with the condition.

In addition to the symptoms listed above, a person experiencing AFib can also feel week, tired, dizzy, have shortness of breath and chest pain. These symptoms can range from being occasional to persistent.

Around 80 percent of strokes caused by AFib can be prevented with proper medical management. The treatment you will receive will be dependent on your symptoms, your history, your current condition, and how long you’ve been experiencing the AFib.

A doctor will look for ways to control the heart rate, prevent blood clots, and reduce the patient’s risk for strokes. Some doctors will prescribe anti-arrhythmic medications or heart rate control medication. Sometimes, medications are not enough.

Physicians can reset the heart rate by doing a cardioversion, which is done either through medications or an electrical shock through the chest by paddles/patches. Patients are often given a blood-thinner medication before this procedure to reduce the risk of blood clots and stroke. For surgical treatment options, a doctor may perform a catheter ablation, a surgical maze procedure, or atrioventricular node ablation.

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms of atrial fibrillation, make an appointment with a doctor today. Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipids & Wellness can examine you and order an electrocardiogram to determine if your systems are indeed caused by AFib or something else. To book an appointment, click here, or call 239-362-3005, ext. 200. Dr. Kordonowy offers direct patient care membership and concierge services including the unique Inpatient Advocate Service™

 

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August 30, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.

Such a Pain: The 101 on Gallstones

Sudden pains that pop up in your stomach can be alarming and unsettling. You may frantically ask yourself “Do I have gas?” “Is my appendix going to burst,” and “Are my kidneys failing?”  With so many organs in your abdomen, there’s many reasons your stomach area can be experiencing pain. Some pains are minor and the feeling will pass in a short amount of time, while other pains are more severe and may signify a more serious issue or life-threatening condition. One such cause of abdominal pain are gallbladder issues, including gallstones and gallbladder. In this article, I will discuss these conditions and share what causes them, how to determine If you have a gallbladder problem, and treatment.

Where is your gallbladder? The gallbladder sits in the upper right part of your abdomen just under your liver. This organ’s purpose is to store and concentrate bile, provide bile salts for fat digestion, and it also helps cholesterol transport and recycling.

Gallstones, for the most part, begin to form in the gallbladder when the cholesterol cannot be kept in a dissolved state, so it begins to crystallize and turn to stones. When these stone get larger, they’re known as gallstones. If they don’t affect bile movement a person will never know these stones are there, because they have no signs or symptoms. Stones can be seen with imaging techniques such as  ultrasound or CT scan.

A person’s gender and race seems to dictate the likelihood of developing gallstones. For example, gallstones are prevalent in 5 percent of black males but 64 percent in Native American women.

How do you know if your pain is gallstone pain? You will feel this pain in the upper center or right of the abdomen; this pain will be persistent for one to six hours, especially after eating fatty/rich foods. Often, this obstruction in the bile duct will resolve on its own and pain will disappear; however, if this pain lasts longer than six hours, the pressure in the gallbladder builds leading to distension, inflammation and swelling; this is referred to as cholecystitis.

If a patient has cholecystitis and it is quickly diagnosed, it will be treated with fluids, bowel rest, and antibiotics. If they have another attack, gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy) is a recommended. If not treated right away, the cholecystitis symptoms will worsen; a person will become feverish, nauseous, and even vomit. The pain will begin to spread up to the upper part of the back, and this is when a person usually heads to urgent care or the ER.

Serious cases of cholecystitis can lead to further and more life-threatening complications such as infection of the liver bile ducts, gangrene of the gallbladder, and pancreatitis. All these conditions require hospitalization, drainage and antibiotics.

If a cholecystectomy is needed, gallbladder removal, this is a same day surgery and patient can eat later in the day or the following day. A person doesn’t need a gallbladder to survive. Without the gallbladder, only small amounts of fat can be digest at a time. If a person consumes too much fat, he or she will experience diarrhea.

If you been experiencing abdominal pain, it’s time to see your doctor. If it’s extreme and you are unable to see your doctor quickly, head to the ER or an urgent care center. For a primary doctor in the Fort Myers area, contact Dr. Kordonowy of Internal Medicine, Lipid & Wellness. Through an examination and testing, Dr. Kordonowy can diagnosis the cause of your stomach pain. To book an appointment, click here or call 239-362-3005, ext. 200.  Dr. Kordonowy is a concierge doctor and provides direct primary care services.

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August 23, 2017
Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

About Dr. Raymond Kordonowy

Private Practice Medicine. President of IPALC. Delegate for the FMA,. Member of the National Lipid Association, and Florida Lipid foundation. I have provided CME lectures in the area of cholesterol disorders. Areas of interest : General Internal Medicine are advanced lipid testing/Lipidology, difficult to manage lipid cases, obesity, diet and nutritional assessment, wellness. I am married to Margaret and our two grown boys are Nicholas and Matthew. Hobbies mostly reading, listening to music economics, jogging, bad mandolin playing and upland bird hunting.